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John Rawls' Theory of Social Justice: An Introduction by Elizabeth H. Smith, H. Gene Blocker

By Elizabeth H. Smith, H. Gene Blocker

520 web page paperback philosophy booklet.

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The central organ of the League of Nations would have to be an elected general council and not consist merely of the ad hoc meetings of Foreign Ministers. It would be invested with wider functions than the preservation of peace, such as the furtherance of international cooperation in matters of trade, finance, hygiene, labour law, transport, communications, philanthropy and science. Its powers would depend upon the sanctions and guarantees by which the signatory nations supported the processes of arbitration and conciliation.

He thus implied that the war was something they had to endure, faithful to their country, but in no way approving of the decisions that had led to it. It was all too subtle for some of the speakers who followed MacDonald who wanted to know where he stood and what he was doing for the war effort. 41 The unions which had supported the war effort with barely a murmur of dissent were more representative of the party, it was now asserted, than ‘the small coterie of the Independent Labour Party’. But other delegates pointed out that it was possible to be for the war and their country without having to believe that the Government’s decisions had been ‘fully justified’ as the resolution maintained.

But Hobson and his co-thinkers in the UDC wanted to democratise these arrangements. The central organ of the League of Nations would have to be an elected general council and not consist merely of the ad hoc meetings of Foreign Ministers. It would be invested with wider functions than the preservation of peace, such as the furtherance of international cooperation in matters of trade, finance, hygiene, labour law, transport, communications, philanthropy and science. Its powers would depend upon the sanctions and guarantees by which the signatory nations supported the processes of arbitration and conciliation.

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